Top Doctors

For Your Peace Of Mind: Our Annual List Of The Very Best Physicians In Memphis!



Cities are often judged by the quality of their doctors — the brilliance, ingenuity, dedication, and compassion that shapes their work with individual patients. Memphis is fortunate to claim many outstanding physicians who devote their careers to medical research and treatment. In light of their contributions, we offer this list of the top doctors in Memphis.

The list was compiled by the New York-based research group, Castle Connolly Medical Ltd., which annually conducts national surveys of the best doctors in America. Their physician-led team of researchers follows a rigorous screening process to select the best physicians on both regional and national levels, and in various fields, from cardiovascular and endocrinology, to internal medicine and hematology.

The list is arranged alphabetically by specialty. Within each specialty, we provide the doctors’ names, hospital affiliations, the names and addresses of their groups or clinics, their phone numbers, and their areas of expertise.

We hope this survey’s results will lead you, our readers, not only to the most acclaimed physicians in a specific field, but will also shed light on the caliber of medical care and research taking place right here in Memphis.

Following the Top Docs listing are informative profiles of area physicians and their practices, beginning on page 74. We hope this entire package will help you choose a physician when you, or a member of your family, requires one.

 

Dr. James D. Eason | Surgery

Methodist University Hospital

Even in tragedies, good fortune can emerge. That’s been true for Dr. James Eason, who says Hurricane Katrina blew him to Memphis. When the storm struck New Orleans in 2005, he and his colleagues lived in the transplant clinic at Ochsner Medical Center. “We were protected by the levees from flooding,” he recalls, “but rainwater poured through broken windows and skylights.” The clinic closed for awhile, but Eason stayed put, hoping to ride out the devastation. His patients, however, were forced to relocate or seek transplant services elsewhere.

Serendipitously, Eason — who was born in Memphis and grew up in Jackson, Tennessee  — had already been contacted about a position here. And in April 2006, he was named Chief of Transplantation Surgery at Methodist University Hospital and Program Director of its Transplant Institute, which is a partnership between Methodist and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Today the program ranks among the largest in the nation. “The year before I came, only 35 liver transplants were performed,” says Eason. “Now we do over 120 a year. We also perform more than 100 kidney transplants.”

In addition to ranking in the top 10 liver transplant programs for the past four years, “we have the world’s largest experience of liver transplant patients who have never received steroids,” he explains. “Steroids have been a primary anti-rejection medication but they have lots of side effects.” Instead, says Eason, the Institute’s protocol is to give patients two doses of intravenous antibody to inhibit the cells that cause rejection. And the program’s 90 percent success rate — which means 90 percent of liver transplant patients are alive a year after surgery — is higher than the national average.

Eason graduated from UT medical school, trained in transplant surgery at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and has performed more than 1,000 liver transplants alone. He credits his team of liver, kidney, and pancreas specialists and surgeons for the program’s excellent outcome, and says, “We’ve built the trust of referring physicians in the community.”

While 80 percent of the Institute’s patients are from the Mid-South, its reputation attracts worldwide referrals. Perhaps its most famous patient has been Apple CEO Steve Jobs, who in 2009 received a liver transplant as treatment for a rare type of tumor. Some controversy arose about whether Jobs received special status because of his fame. But Eason says that Jobs was at the highest risk of death within three months at the time of his surgery. The Model for Endstage Liver Disease (MELD) score uses three lab values that predict mortality. “His score was the highest,” says Eason, who performed the surgery.

More common causes for liver transplants are hepatitis C — which many patients contracted through tainted blood at blood banks in the 1970s and ’80s — primary liver cancer, and fatty liver. The latter is related to obesity, and part of the institute’s mission is educating people about lifestyle changes.

While the MELD score predicts who gets a liver transplant, kidneys are allocated based on waiting time and donor match. “Patients with kidney disease are usually maintained on dialysis,” says Eason, “and we do know the longer someone is on dialysis, the greater their risk of death. So waiting time is important.” The average wait for a new kidney is two to three years. For a liver, it may be a few days or weeks, and some with a lower MELD score may wait longer. Because the supply of organs is always limited, Eason says the Institute aggressively seeks donors.

As for returning to his native city, Eason declares, “Memphis was originally my home and I’m happy to say my daughters [ages 17 and 20] consider it home as well.” Though his father and great-grandfather were physicians, his daughters are charting other career paths — one in psychology, the other in art or architecture. Says Eason with a laugh, “I think I scared them away from medical school.” — Marilyn Sadler

 

Patricia M. Flynn | Pediatric Infectious Disease

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

They say time heals all wounds, and, one way or another, it does. But Dr. Patricia Flynn can’t help but wonder what’s in store for the patients she has yet to meet, and what might have been for the ones she couldn’t save.

Flynn is the Director of Clinical Research in the Department of Infectious Diseases at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. She’s also the hospital’s Arthur Ashe Chair in Pediatric AIDS Research, Director of the Translational Trials Unit, and Co-leader of HIV Therapeutics & Vaccine Development (CIDC).

She’s worked in Infectious Diseases since the department’s inception in 1987 and has been following the HIV-AIDS pandemic almost since the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention first announced it in 1981. (HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.)

If Flynn is anything, she is a student of time’s reversals. She’s felt the helplessness that comes from losing a game of clinical beat-the-clock, and she’s also intimately acquainted with the hope that a new or better therapy can bring.

“There have been so many times I’ve seen a patient and thought, God, if you’d have been five years later [with your disease], we could have helped you,” she says. “And now I think what will we have in five years that we don’t have now? We’ve got to find that out.”

Flynn came to Memphis in 1981 to complete her pediatric residency through a joint program between St. Jude and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. After working with some of the earliest pediatric AIDS cases, Flynn was recruited to help launch St. Jude’s pediatric HIV-AIDS program. Hospital officials had recognized the disease’s catastrophic implications and the different types of cancer that patients tended to develop after contracting the virus. “So there was this natural linkage between cancer and HIV,” she says. And, as with cancer, researchers realized managing AIDS would require a series of treatments. Even now, at least three drugs must be taken to control symptoms. “The amount of knowledge we’ve gained about HIV has grown exponentially since then,” Flynn says.

With support from the National Institutes of Health, Flynn and others embarked on a clinical trial of a then-experimental drug that later became a powerful tool in disrupting the disease. “Part of the data we collected here was to use didanosine to treat HIV-infected children,” she says. Later, around 1994, the NIH chose Flynn’s department to study children and pregnant women infected with HIV. That study demonstrated that giving the drug AZT to women during pregnancy reduced the transmission rate from mother to baby by about two-thirds.

But in the early days, an AIDS diagnosis almost always amounted to a death sentence. Flynn remembers the case of a little boy who had developed acute myeloid leukemia in the mid-’80s. His prognosis wasn’t hopeful, but he managed to survive, only to become infected with HIV after a blood transfusion. Because of his suppressed immune system, the child contracted a severe form of pneumonia before he could gain access to experimental AZT treatments.

“We were working very diligently to get this patient [into] a clinical research study in North Carolina, but he died before we could get the drug,” Flynn says. Her professional mask slips for a moment as the emotions wash through her. “Those are the patients you think about,” she says.

Ultimately, her goal and the goal of her colleagues is to find a cure for AIDS. But the likelihood of such a breakthrough anytime soon is doubtful, she says.

“Part of the issue is that the virus integrates itself into the host’s cells, and all the drugs we have now are designed to interrupt the virus replicating,” she says. “When you remove the pressure of the drugs, [the virus] begins to replicate again.”

Will Flynn and her team discover a cure? Only time will tell. — Lindsay Jones

 

Dr. Daniel C. Martin | Reproductive Endocrinology

Baptist Memorial Hospital

Dr. Dan Martin’s whole family is involved in medicine; his father was a physician, and his grandmother nudged her children into the field as well. After graduating from medical school at Emory University and completing his residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Martin moved to Memphis in 1977 to stay close to family. Immediately he was immersed in the rigorous atmosphere of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

“At the time I made the decision, the department had three sub-specialties  — oncology, high-risk obstetrics, and reproductive endocrinology,” says Martin. “I fit the last one best, because I like surgery, long-term care of patients, and establishing relationships with people.”

He practices a combination of reproductive endocrinology and routine gynecology, while serving as Divisional Director of Minimally Invasive Surgery for UT Medical Group, Inc. The bulk of Martin’s surgical research focuses on endometriosis, a common condition in which tissues typically  occurring in the pelvic area behave like the cells lining the uterus (endometrium) and grow in other areas of the body, causing pain, irregular bleeding, and possible infertility. Martin has published 41 papers on the subject, which can be found in PubMed, the National Library of Medicine’s biomedical citation database. And almost half of the infertility cases he treats are the result of endometriosis.

Some treatments he recommends for the condition are as simple as over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs, like Aleve and Advil. Beyond that, he says, “birth control pills work well, and the hormone progestin. Other medications have more side effects, including one that actually knocks out brain hormones to make a woman’s body behave as if she’s going through menopause.”

In addition to offering medical therapies, Martin also treats endometriosis with laparoscopic surgery, which is minimally invasive and results in reduced pain and hemorrhaging and a shorter recovery period. “About half of my patients can be taken care of with one small incision in their belly button,” says Martin.

Of the patients he sees, 60 percent experience infertility, and the condition encompasses a wide range of physical and emotional factors that may be attributed to either the female or the male partner. Martin often suggests treating infertility without the use of test tubes, or in vitro fertilization. For women with hormonal imbalances, alternatives include the use of estrogen-inducing clomiphene, a widely used fertility drug; and Metformin, a medication for diabetics that not only reduces glucose levels but can lower testosterone as well.

Martin sticks to the least intrusive, most practical methods for his patients, some of whom are male. “We occasionally get men who have abnormal sperm count. For some reason clomiphene also works on them as well as women,” he says. “We also use hCG [human chorionic gonadotropin] injections, a hormone that stimulates the pituitary gland in the brain. About 1 percent of men who have infertility actually have a defect in the brain that prevents it from making enough  hormones. In those men the success rate for using hormonal therapy is very high.”

Along with patients seeking help for infertility, Martin also counsels pregnant women, stressing the importance of optimal health to a normal delivery.

And whether women are trying to get pregnant or have already conceived, he recommends the vital supplement, folic acid. “You need to be on that at least three months before you try to get pregnant in order to decrease the chance of Caesarean section and hypertension,” says Martin. “You also want stay on prenatal vitamins with folic acid while you’re pregnant to decrease the chance of a neural tube defect” —  which is an opening in the spinal cord or brain and occurs in one in 1,000 live births in the U.S.  As for hypertension, he adds, “Pregnant patients are more prone to developing high blood pressure than others. It’s just a natural part of the process.” — Ashley Johnston

 

Giancarlo Mari | Maternal Fetal Medicine

Regional Medical Center

Every baby is a miracle. Some, though, need a little help from lifesavers like Dr. Giancarlo Mari. Chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Mari helped deliver a baby girl in 2005 who weighed 360 grams, less than a single pound. Today, that child is healthy and happy. A miracle.

A native of Salerno, Italy, Mari studied medicine at the University of Naples before he started globe-trotting as he built his career in a field — maternal fetal medicine — ready to explode with advances in the mid-Eighties. He cites mentors in Parma, London, and Rotterdam as inspiration for developing his specialty and looks back to his move to the United States — first to Houston, in 1987 — as the launch of a career that has made fetal development safer for both mothers and babies.

“I thought at the time that medicine in the United States was tops in the world,” says Mari. “To go to the United States, for a doctor in Europe, was like a second graduation. Initially, it was like a vacation. But I started to see the kind of medicine practiced in this country. It’s where I wanted to practice. I had to start from scratch.” Mari landed a residency at Yale University — world-renowned for maternal fetal medicine — and trained in New Haven for ten years. After Yale, Mari worked and taught at the University of Virginia, Cincinnati, and Wayne State (in Detroit) before joining the UTHSC faculty in 2008.

“I saw the high number of infant deaths in Memphis,” reflects Mari, “and the population of this area interested me. In Memphis, I thought, maybe I can help. I’ve been a part of research that has changed the standard of [maternal/fetal] care.

“Fifteen years ago, we were doing a lot of invasive procedures,” he continues, “sticking needles in the belly of a patient, taking blood from the umbilical cord to see if the baby was anemic. Unfortunately, many babies died because of these procedures. Most of the time, the procedures were unnecessary, but it was how we were practicing.”

Shortly after his arrival in America, Mari began research on the possibilities of using ultrasound to detect fetal anemia. “Many people were skeptical at the time, because it was so simple,” says Mari. “I was one of a very few in the world doing this for ten years. Finally, I was able to put together a multicenter study that was published in The New England Journal of Medicine in 2000. Slowly, people started using this technique, and the number of invasive procedures decreased. It’s become a standard of care. Today, we barely do any invasive procedures. Many babies are having happy and healthy lives thanks to this technique.”

One of Mari’s more recent battles has been against Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndrome, a heartbreaking condition in which identical twins who share a single placenta suffer from an imbalance in blood flow. One baby takes in too much blood and produces too much urine, while the second is deprived of the necessary fluids. Untreated, both twins usually die.

A new technique — laser ablation of vascular communication — allows doctors to intervene. “We place an endoscope within the belly of the mom,” explains Mari, “near the baby [with excessive fluid]. We look into the placenta, to find where the [blood transfer] is, and we interrupt the communication. It’s like having two placentas. Blood doesn’t transfer any more. This procedure is the best form of therapy, but it’s not perfect. We still see babies with problems, and some still die. But if we didn’t do anything, the outcome would be much worse.” With doctors trained in the procedure at Le Bonheur and The Med, Memphis is among the few cities in the country offering this option for unborn twins.

Mari and his wife, Dr. Laura Detti, are raising two children — Michael and Camilla — in Memphis, and the Bluff City has come to feel like home, even for a life-saving  globe-trotter. “I’m interested in what’s new,” says Mari. “How can my work continue to help others? People who work with me are excited to come to work. It’s friendly, and we work together for progress.” — Frank Murtaugh

 

Bettina Ault | Pediatric Nephrology

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital

Looking back on her career in pediatric nephrology, Dr. Bettina Ault likes to tell people she was born to work in her field of choice. She entered the world, you see, in 1954, the same year as the first living kidney transplant. But it wasn’t until she was in graduate school at Harvard (studying immunology), that her father convinced her to go to medical school. Ault chuckles when reflecting on her dad’s motive: “He really just wanted to make sure I could support myself.” Countless young lives have been improved as a result of Ault’s decision to build a career fighting kidney ailments.

“I’ve always been a science nerd,” says Ault. “I was interested in inflammation and infectious diseases. I was a fourth-year medical student [at UT-Memphis], and there wasn’t an intern or resident on the rotation, so I ended up functioning at a much higher level. I had a wonderful time. Immunology and genetics are involved in nephrology, things I was interested in. It was a good fit, a logical fit.”

After spending much of the 1990s in St. Louis and Chicago, Ault was recruited back to Memphis by the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in 1997, where she’s now Associate Professor of Pediatrics. “There are no better doctors that I’ve worked with anywhere than here in Memphis,” says Ault.

Active with both St. Jude Children’s Research Center and Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, Ault has seen firsthand the advances nephrology has taken over the last quarter-century. Kidney ailments in children are rare, notes Ault, but the challenges kids face with damaged or diseased kidneys can be severe. “We do maybe one-tenth of the transplants that are done with adults,” she explains. “The thing that’s important about treating children with kidney disease is that they have their whole lives ahead of them, and they have issues that are unique to children. Sometimes they don’t grow well. You have to pay really close attention to bone disease if they’re on dialysis.”

Remarkably, a child as small as 22 pounds can receive an adult’s kidney. New and better drugs — calcineurin inhibitors like cyclosporine to prevent transplant rejection — have made kidney transplants easier over the last 20 years, with fewer steroids necessary as a child learns to adapt to a new organ. Ault notes, though, that social hurdles can interfere with a return to normalcy for a recipient. “Our biggest challenge,” she says, “is that teenagers are terrible about taking their [twice daily, anti-rejection] medicine. They have the worst rate of graft loss of anyone except people over 65. They get very busy with their lives, and they often don’t have a routine. There’s also a problem with them not wanting to be different. Peer pressure can be huge.”

Ault finds the loss of a transplanted kidney — due often to a recipient simply not taking medicine regularly — among the most heartbreaking elements of her career. “Your body is so much healthier with a transplant,” emphasizes Ault. “Dialysis ages your body dreadfully. With a properly functioning kidney, you are, for all intents and purposes, normal.”

Among Ault’s passions is an annual camp for kidney patients — some with transplants, some on dialysis — in Lyles, Tennessee. Held in June each year, Camp Okawehna is a reminder to young people that they’re not alone in fighting kidney disease. Peer pressure tends to subside when you see an outdoor dialysis unit.

“Kids get their dialysis treatment with the birds chirping,” explains Ault. “An occasional mouse runs by. They have their treatment, then they can go work on a talent show, or go swimming. It gives these kids a peer group. Sometimes kids with kidney disease have sort of a vulnerable-child syndrome, and they’re not well-socialized. But [at Camp Okawehna], everybody has scars. Everybody has their stories.”

A doctor born at the dawn of the kidney-transplant age finds herself spearheading a movement that should impact generations to come.

“My mission,” she stresses “is to make all my patients happy, normal, productive individuals.” — Frank Murtaugh

 

 Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. is a healthcare research and information company founded in 1991 by a former medical college board chairman and president to help guide consumers to America’s top doctors and top hospitals. Castle Connolly’s established survey and research process, under the direction of an M.D., involves tens of thousands of top doctors and the medical leadership of leading hospitals.

Castle Connolly’s physician-led team of researchers follows a rigorous screening process to select top doctors on both the national and regional levels. Physicians — in private practice as well as those in medical leadership positions in hospitals — are invited via mail, fax, email, and various communications directly to hospitals and county medical societies, to participate in an online nominations process to identify highly skilled, exceptional doctors. Careful screening of doctors’ educational and professional experience is essential before final selection is made among those physicians most highly regarded by their peers.

The result? We identify the top doctors in America and provide you, the consumer, with detailed information about their education, training, and special expertise in our paperback guides, national and regional magazine “Top Doctors” features, and online directories.

Doctors do not and cannot pay to be selected and profiled as Castle Connolly Top Doctors.

Physicians selected for inclusion in this magazine’s ”Top Doctors” feature may also appear as Regional Top Doctors online at www.castleconnolly.com, or in one of Castle Connolly’s Top Doctors guides, such as America’s Top Doctors® or America’s Top Doctors® for Cancer.

 

Allergy & Immunology

D. Betty Lew
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
777 Washington Ave., Suite P110
Memphis, TN 38105
448-2010
Pediatric Allergy & Immunology, Immune Deficiency

Phillip L. Lieberman
Baptist Memorial Hospital
Methodist University Hospital
7205 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 200
Germantown, TN 38138
757-6100
Asthma, Rhinitis, Anaphylaxis, Urticaria

Cardiovascular Disease

Frank A. McGrew III
Baptist Memorial Hospital
Stern Cardiovascular Center
8060 Wolf River Blvd.
Germantown, TN 38138
271-1000
Congestive Heart Failure, Pacemakers, Acute Coronary Syndromes

Judith E. Soberman
Baptist Memorial Hospital
UT Medical Group – Cardiology
1325 Eastmoreland Ave., Suite 365
Memphis, TN 38104
866-8803
Preventive Cardiology, Arrhythmia

Karl T. Weber
Regional Medical Center
Methodist University Hospital
UT Medical Group – Cardiology
Medplex Cardiology Clinic
880 Madison Ave., Floor 5
Memphis, TN 38103
545-6969
Congestive Heart Failure

Child & Adult Psychiatry

Jerry D. Heston
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
Child & Adolescent Psychiatric Associates
1135 Cully Rd., Suite 100
Cordova, TN 38016
752-1980
ADD/ADHD, Depression, Asperger’s Syndrome

Child Neurology

James W. Wheless
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
50 N. Dunlap St., Suite 400
Memphis, TN 38103
287-5060
Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders

Clinical Genetics

Owen P. Phillips
Regional Medical Center
Baptist Memorial Hospital
UT Medical Group – Center for High Risk Pregnancies
6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 150
Memphis, TN 38120
866-8085
Genetic Prenatal Diagnosis, Pregnancy-High Risk

Jewell C. Ward
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
711 Jefferson Ave., Suite 523
Memphis, TN 38105
866-8818
Inborn Errors of Metabolism, Metabolic Genetic Disorders, Phenylketonuria (PKU), Reproductive Genetics

Dermatology

Rex A. Amonette
Memphis Dermatology Clinic
1455 Union Ave.
Memphis, TN 38104
726-6655
Skin Cancer, Mohs’ Surgery

Diagnostic Radiology

Harris L. Cohen
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
Dept. of Radiology, Ground Floor
50 N. Dunlap St.
Memphis, TN 38103
287-6938
Pediatric Radiology, Fetal Ultrasound/Obstetrical Imaging, Ultrasound

Gastroenterology

Jaquelyn Fleckenstein
Methodist University Hospital
UT Medical Group – Gastroenterology
1325 Eastmoreland Ave., Suite 365
Memphis, TN 38104
866-8864
Liver Disease, Cirrhosis, Hepatitis C

Hematology

Patricia Adams-Graves
Regional Medical Center
UT Medical Group – Hematology
880 Madison Ave., Floor 5
Sickle Cell Center
Memphis, TN 38103
545-8535
Sickle Cell Disease

Lee S. Schwartzberg
Baptist Memorial Hospital
The West Clinic
100 N. Humphreys Blvd.
Memphis, TN 38120
683-0055
Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Stem Cell Transplant

Internal Medicine

James E. Bailey
Regional Medical Center
UT Medical Group – Internal Medicine
Medplex Medicine Clinic
880 Madison Ave., Floor 5
Memphis, TN 38103
545-6969
Hypertension, Preventive Medicine

Robert E. Morrison
Regional Medical Center
Baptist Memorial Hospital
UT Medical Group – Internal Medicine
Medplex Medicine Clinic
880 Madison Ave., Floor 5
Memphis, TN 38103
545-6969
Infectious Disease

Kathryn M. Ryder
VA Medical Center
1030 Jefferson Ave.
Memphis, TN 38104
523-8990
Women’s Health

Maternal & Fetal Medicine

Giancarlo Mari
Regional Medical Center
UT Medical Group – OB/GYN
880 Madison Ave., Suite 3D01
Memphis, TN 38103
448-3700
Fetal Therapy, Obstetric Ultrasound, Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome (TTTS)

Medical Oncology

Barry Boston
Saint Francis Hospital
Methodist University Hospital
UT Cancer Institute
7945 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 300
Germantown, TN 38138
752-6131
Gastrointestinal Cancer, Genitourinary Cancer, Prostate Cancer

Raymond Osarogiagbon
Methodist University Hospital
Baptist Memorial Hospital
UT Cancer Institute
1331 Union Ave., Suite 800
Memphis, TN 38104
725-1785
Esophageal Cancer, Lung Cancer, Gastrointestinal Cancer, Sickle Cell Disease

Furhan Yunus
Methodist University Hospital
Regional Medical Center
UT Cancer Institute
1331 Union Ave., Suite 800
Memphis, TN 38104
725-1785
Multiple Myeloma, Lymphoma

Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine

Ramasubbareddy Dhanireddy
Regional Medical Center
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
UT Medical Group – Neonatology
Newborn Center
853 Jefferson Ave., Suite 201
Memphis, TN 38103
448-5950
Neonatology, Prematurity/Low Birth Weight Infants

Neurological Surgery

Frederick A. Boop
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
Methodist University Hospital
6325 Humphreys Blvd.
Memphis, TN 38120
259-5340
Pediatric Neurosurgery, Epilepsy, Brain Tumors

Kevin T. Foley
Methodist University Hospital
Baptist Memorial Hospital
Semmes-Murphey Clinic
6325 Humphreys Blvd.
Memphis, TN 38120
522-7700
Spinal Surgery, Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery

Jon H. Robertson
Methodist University Hospital
UT Dept. of Neurosurgery
6325 Humphreys Blvd.
Memphis, TN 38120
259-5340
Brain & Spinal Cord Tumors, Skull Base Surgery, Gamma Knife Surgery

Robert A. Sanford
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
6325 Humphreys Blvd.
Memphis, TN 38120
259-5340
Pediatric Neurosurgery, Brain Tumors-Pediatric

Neurology

Mark S. LeDoux
Methodist University Hospital
UT Medical Group – Neurology
1325 Eastmoreland Ave., Suite 365
Memphis, TN 38104
866-8811
Movement Disorders, Botox Therapy, Deep Brain Stimulation, Dystonia

Obstetrics & Gynecology

Edwin M. Thorpe, Jr.
Regional Medical Center
UT Medical Group — OB/GYN
880 Madison Ave., Suite 3E01
Memphis, TN 38103
866-8814
Infectious Disease-Gynecologic, AIDS/HIV in Pregnancy-Consultation, Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Ophthalmology

Barrett Haik
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
UT Medical Group – Pediatric Ophthalmology
Hamilton Eye Institute
930 Madison Ave., Suite 400
Memphis, TN 38103
7945 Wolf River Blvd.
Germantown, TN 38138
448-6650
Eye Tumors/Cancer, Orbital Diseases

Natalie C. Kerr
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
Hamilton Eye Institute
930 Madison Ave., Suite 400
Memphis, TN 38103
7945 Wolf River Blvd.
Germantown, TN 38138
448-6650
Pediatric Ophthalmology, Strabismus, Cataract-Pediatric, Genetic Disorders-Eye

Matthew W. Wilson
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
Methodist University Hospital
UT Medical Group – Ophthalmology
Hamilton Eye Institue
930 Madison Ave., Suite 200
Memphis, TN 38103
448-6650
Eye Tumors/Cancer, Retinoblastoma, Melanoma-Choroidal (Eye)

Orthopedic Surgery

James H. Beaty
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
Campbell Clinic
1400 S. Germantown Rd.
Germantown, TN 38138
759-3125
Pediatric Orthopedic Surgery, Clubfoot, Fractures-Pediatric

James L. Guyton
Baptist Memorial Hospital
Methodist Le Bonheur
Germantown Hospital
Campbell Clinic
1400 S. Germantown Rd.
Germantown, TN 38138
759-3111
Joint Replacement, Pelvic Trauma

G. Andrew Murphy
Baptist Memorial Hospital
Campbell Clinic
1400 S. Germantown Rd.
Germantown, TN 38138
759-3111
Foot & Ankle Surgery

Otolaryngology

Sandeep Samant
Methodist University Hospital
UT Medical Group – Otolaryngology / Head & Neck Surgery
7945 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 220
Germantown, TN 38138
347-8220
Head & Neck Cancer & Surgery, Skull Base Surgery, Endoscopic Surgery, Thyroid & Parathyroid Cancer & Surgery

Pathology

Carolyn M. Chesney
Baptist Memorial Hospital
Pathology Group of the Mid-South, Inc.
7550 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 200
Germantown, TN 38138
226-0652
Hematopathology, Bleeding/Coagulation Disorders

Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

Kanwaljeet Singh Anand
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
50 N. Dunlap St.
Memphis, TN 38103
287-5925
Pain Management, Critical Care

Pediatric Gastroenterology

Dennis D. Black
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
777 Washington Ave., Suite P110
Memphis, TN 38105
448-2000
Nutrition, Obesity

Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

Daniel M. Green
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
Dept. of Epidemiology & Cancer Control
262 Danny Thomas Pl., MS 735
Memphis, TN 38105
595-5915
Wilms’ Tumor, Fertility in Cancer Survivors, Cancer Survivors-Late Effects of Therapy

Joseph H. Laver
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
262 Danny Thomas Pl., Room C-7045E
Memphis, TN 38105
595-3532
Stem Cell Transplant, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin’s

Wing-Hang Leung
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
262 Danny Thomas Pl., Room C6072, MS 260
Bone Marrow Transplant & Cellular Therapy
Memphis, TN 38105
495-3300
Bone Marrow & Stem Cell Transplant, Cancer Survivors-Late Effects of Therapy

Ching-Hon Pui
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
262 Danny Thomas Pl.
Memphis, TN 38105
595-3606
Leukemia, Lymphoma

Raul Ribiero
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
262 Danny Thomas Pl., Room S2012, MS 721
Memphis, TN 38105
595-3694
Leukemia, Lymphoma

Winfred C. Wang
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
262 Danny Thomas Pl., MS 800
Memphis, TN 38105
595-2051
Sickle Cell Disease, Bone Marrow Failure Disorders, Anemia-Aplastic

Pediatric Infectious Disease

Patricia M. Flynn
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
262 Danny Thomas Pl., Room Q1114, MS 600
Memphis, TN 38105
595-2338
AIDS/HIV, Infections in Immunocompromised Patients, Clinical Trials

Pediatric Nephrology

Bettina H. Ault
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
777 Washington Ave., Suite P110
Memphis, TN 38105
866-8822
Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Kidney Failure, Anemia

Robert J. Wyatt
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
UT Dept. of Pediatrics
777 Washington Ave., Suite P110
Memphis, TN 38105
448-2070
Kidney Disease-Autoimmune, Berger’s Disease (IgA Nephropathy)

Pediatric Pulmonology

Robert Schoumacher
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
777 Washington Ave., Suite P110
Memphis, TN 38105
287-5222
Cystic Fibrosis, Sleep Disorders/Apnea

Pediatric Surgery

Andrew M. Davidoff
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
Dept. of Surgery
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
262 Danny Thomas Pl., MS 133
Memphis, TN 38105
595-4060
Neuroblastoma, Cancer Surgery

Pediatrics

Noel K. Frizzell
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
Pediatric Consultants
777 Washington Ave., Suite P410
Memphis, TN 38105
523-2945
Brain Injury Rehabilitation, Chronic Illness

Radiation Oncology

Larry E. Kun
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital
262 Danny Thomas Pl., MS 220
Memphis, TN 38105
595-3565
Brain Tumors, Pediatric Cancers

Thomas E. Merchant
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
262 Danny Thomas Pl., MS 220
Memphis, TN 38105
595-3565
Brain Tumors-Pediatric

Reproductive Endocrinology

William H. Kutteh
Baptist Memorial Hospital
Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital
80 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 307
Memphis, TN 38120
747-2229
Miscarriage-Recurrent, Infertility

Daniel C. Martin
Baptist Memorial Hospital
Methodist University Hospital
UT Medical Group – OB/GYN
7945 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 320
Germantown, TN 38138
347-8320
Reproductive Surgery, Infertility, Tubal Ligation Reversal-Microsurgery, Endometriosis

Surgery

Stephen W. Behrman
Baptist Memorial Hospital
Methodist University Hospital
UT Medical Group – Surgery
7945 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 280
Germantown, TN 38138
347-8270
Gastrointestinal Cancer, Hepatobiliary Surgery, Pancreatic Cancer, Inflammatory Bowel Disease

James Eason
Methodist University Hospital
UT Medical Group – Transplant Surgery
Transplant Institute
1265 Union Ave., Room S1011
Memphis, TN 38104
516-7469
Transplant-Kidney, Transplant-Pancreas & Liver, Liver Cancer

Thoracic Surgery

Darryl S. Weiman
VA Medical Center
Dept. of Surgery
1030 Jefferson Ave., Floor 3
Memphis, TN 38104
577-7352
Cardiothoracic Surgery, Lung Cancer

Urology

Anthony L. Patterson
UT Medical Center
UT Medical Group — Urology
7945 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 350
Germantown, TN 38138
347-8350
Laparoscopic Surgery, Kidney Stones

Robert W. Wake
Methodist University Hospital
UT Medical Group – Urology
7945 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 350
Germantown, TN 38138
448-1026
Prostate Cancer, Erectile Dysfunction, Kidney Stones, Incontinence

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