Lost Memphis: The Pig 'n Whistle



From 1929 until it closed in 1966, the place to be in Memphis was 1579 Union. A drive-in with the curious name of Pig ‘n Whistle lured Elvis Presley, Dewey Phillips, and thousands of teenagers to its giant parking lot, night after night, where they could sip nickel Cokes and munch on 15-cent hamburgers, served up by carhops with such nicknames as Preacher, Redwood, Pharoah, and Gypsy.

Years ago, I remember speaking with Monroe Brown Jr., who worked as a carhop at the Pig in the late 1940s. He remembers that they had to be “rippin’ and runnin’” all the time, since they received no salary — only tips — and had to compete for business with 14 other carhops.

Samuel Peace, a carhop from 1944 to 1950, recalled sitting in the back of a car in the Pig’s parking lot at night and singing along with Elvis Presley “before he was known.”

The carhops knew — and greeted — every customer by name. If a stranger pulled into the lot, they would look up the car’s license number in a book and find the driver’s name. Such measures ensured a nice tip.

Old-timers may recall a cook named Katy Brown, who could whip up 12 barbecue sandwiches in less than a minute. Back in those days, the staff used code names for food. A hamburger was a “brother,” a hotdog was a “sweetheart,” and a small Coke was a “shot.” Order a couple of “Palm Beaches” with a “King” and a “Goo” and you got two pimiento cheese sandwiches, a Budweiser, and a malt.

“The Pit was a real hangout,” one of the managers told a newspaper reporter years ago. “That’s where Memphis went to let its hair down.”

After it closed, the Tudor-style building housed AAA auto club offices and the Dixie Auto Club, and then a stained-glass studio, but the decaying building was finally torn down in 1994. A FedEx Office copy center stands on the site today.

Add your comment:
Edit Module

Buy the Ask Vance Books

Edit ModuleShow Tags


Ask Vance

Famed Memphis Trivia Expert

About This Blog

Ask Vance is the blog of Vance Lauderdale, the award-winning columnist of Memphis magazine and MBQ: Inside Memphis Business.  Vance is the author of three books: Ask Vance: The Best Questions and Answers from Memphis Magazine's History and Trivia Expert (2003), as well as Ask Vance: More Questions and Answers from Memphis Magazine's History Expert (2011) and Vance Lauderdale's Lost Memphis (2013). He is also the recipient of quite a few nice awards, the creator of several eye-catching wall calendars, and the only person we know with a vintage shock-treatment machine in his den. 

You can find him from time to time in the pages of the Memphis Flyer and MBQ, on WKNO television, and on Facebook. When he is not exploring the highways and byways of Memphis, he spends his time sleeping, napping, and dozing.

Got a question for Vance?  Email him here.

Find Vance's old blog posts (pre-April 2011) and comments here.

Be Vance's friend on Facebook:  facebook.com/vancelauderdale

Recent Posts

Archives

Feed

Atom Feed Subscribe to the Ask Vance Feed »

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags